Calculating Capital Gains for 1031 Exchanges

 

Hi, I’m Jonathan Aceves with Meybohm Commercial, where we help business leaders make wise commercial real estate decisions, and today we’re going to be talking about the basics of 1031 Exchanges and capital gains. 

 

How do you determine what your capital gain will be on a sale?  Let me tell you a story.  I have an acquaintance who sold a building that he’d owned for a very long time for what he thought was a very good price.  He didn’t consult with an accountant, and he didn’t get a commercial broker to review the transaction.  He closed on the sale, and when he sat down with his tax preparer, he learned that he was going to be responsible for over $300,000 in taxes! This means he lost nearly $90,000 on the transaction. This was devastating to him and his family.  

 

So—how do you determine your capital gain and keep this from happening to yourself or someone you care about?  First, you’ll need to know your adjusted basis.  If you own commercial real estate, I can’t tell you how important it is to have a good CPA.  Not a tax preparer but someone who routinely analyses and advises commercial real estate owners on transactions.  Someone like this can compute your adjusted basis in a property quite easily.  Here’s the formula:

Basis at acquisitions

+ Capital Additions

– Cost Recovery Taken

– Basis in partial sales

= Adjusted Basis at Sale

 

Now we can calculate your capital gains: 

Sale Price

-cost of sale

-Adjusted basis

-participation in partial sale

=GAIN or LOSS

-Straight line cost recovery

-Suspended losses

= Capital gain from Appreciation

 

That’s it!  We’ll put our Meybohm Sale Worksheet on the blog that you can download to do this.  Although make sure you have a good CPA perform or check any figures, and advise you on tax implications.  If you don’t have one, reach out to us and we can give you a few recommendations. 

 

If you’re considering selling a property and want to talk about your 1031 exchange options, we’re happy to sit down and review your transaction.  Thanks for watching! Please like and share!  We’d love to hear your feedback and comments! 

 

More resources: 

CSW Capital Overview of 1031 Exchanges

Cherry Bekaert overview of 1031 Exchanges

Major improvements coming to I-20 Exit 183, making way for Amazon Fulfillment Center

The Augusta Chronicle reported that United Infrastructure Group Inc. of Charlotte, NC won the bid for redesigning the Exit 183 interchange, adding two roundabouts and new bridge.  According the GDOT, the bridge will have 12-foot lanes, 12-foot medians, and 8-foot shoulders.  

 

Austin Rhodes broke the story last week that Amazon fulfillment center is coming to the White Oaks Business Park, Columbia County Development Authority’s Industrial park located right off of I-20 at Exit 183, in what could be a 2,000,000 Square Foot facility, bringing 1000 jobs to the area.  

 

What are your thoughts on the development?  Are roundabouts going to be good or bad for this intersection?  
We’d love to hear from you!  

Lessons from Sharedspace in Augusta

Today we’re going to talk about SharedSpace and Coworking with John Cates, COO and General Counsel at Meybohm Real Estate

 

Jonathan Aceves (JA): Tell us a little about your prior experience with the coworking business model.

John Cates (JC): When i was in Atlanta, coworking was just starting to take off.  Not just from a office space model but also as a model of entrepreneurship.  Coworking space like WeWork and others that were purely office tenant landlords but also incubator space.  We were involved with helping the Atlanta Technology Village to get started.  We got to see in Atlanta over a six or seven year period,  the coworking model take shape in all its different forms.  

JA: What was your connection to SharedSpace?

JC: I was approached by the SharedSpace group before they got started as they were looking for different space in Downtown Augusta.  We had some mutual connections from my time in Atlanta.  And they really reached out to me to try to get some advice as to pricing and location and what I thought would work and what wouldn’t work here. I guess a little bit like a sounding board.  They actually approached us about potentially getting involved both from a personal and company standpoint. 

JA: What was your advice at the time in setting up that business?

I think the first thing is that coworking takes different forms depending on the area that you’re in.  So coworking in place like Augusta or you call a secondary market is very different from coworking in Atlanta.  Your pricing needs to be different. Your sizing needs to be different.  The companies yo are going to attract are very different.  And pricing is probably the most important because when you’re dealing with a space like SharedSpace over on Greene Street when you can go over to Broad Street and get a comparable office space.   So i think Coworking is an asset class in and of itself outside of office space and is very unique.  And one of the things I really tried to explain to them was that Augusta is not like Atlanta. That’s not a good or bad thing–it’s just a fact.  Some of the other things were that you need to be really, really careful about how you program the space, because coworking space really only works when it’s programmed properly.  Nobody wants to be in a coworking space by themselves.  You have to create a pretty inviting and exciting entrepreneurial community where you’ve got several people doing different things.  There has to be a good energy there.  And so i think that you really have to do a good job of programming certain events to give people a reason to want to be there, because a lot of people who are there are likely either working at home or they’re working somewhere else.  So you want to build that community, I think that was it.  And one of the parts where I initially tried to offer some advice in addition to that was getting the size correct.  

JA: Do you think we’re seeing a paradigm shift in the coworking space?  Are consumers changing the way they office?  We’ve seen the fall of WeWork, and now this.  What are your thoughts in general about the coworking model?  

JC: I don’t think so. I don’t think it’s the model. I don’t think wework’s struggles through their IPO are really a true reflection of the health of the coworking space and the coworking industry.  Again i think it works, but it has got to be done smaller, then growing larger. That was one of the biggest things that I didn’t necessarily agree with about SharedSpace was that I thought they went too big too fast.  Nobody wants to go into one of these spaces to be alone and what my advice was initially was pick a smaller space, maybe 3000, 4000, 5000 square feet–to be bursting at the seams.  Program it, get people in there, and have a waiting list.  Then once you’ve got that demand there and that community built, then you can transport it to a bigger space.  But by not having the right programming up front, by taking a space that was too big, I think this deincentivized people from wanting to be in there, because nobody wanted to be in there and hear their own voices echo.  So you’ve got to balance the cultural aspect of coworking space with the size of it itself.  Then the other thing is that if someone can go to Broad street, which is two blocks from there and a potentially more desirable location than Greene Street,  and get a location for about the same price for a company of three or four people, then that’s what they’re going to do.  So there’s still a decent amount of good office like that one on Broad Street.  So I don’t know how appealing it would be to me as a small business or as a freelancer to locate my business in there.  And I think what happened was that they ended up getting a few smaller versions of call centers.  And that goes against the whole entrepreneurial atmosphere that you’re trying to create.  

JA: What implications does this business case have for downtown business and retail?  

JC: Well I think the first thing is to understand why it happened.  Just because the concept didn’t work, doesn’t mean that coworking can’t work in Augusta.  There’s a significant demand for it.  And I think one of the things that we saw when I was involved in the Augusta Innovation Zone was that we also got to the point where we were almost going to be in a place that was too big.  And that’s why it didn’t work in the Woolworth building when we were were looking at that a few years ago, and we felt that there was a huge need for it.  And we had a waiting list.  But you had to start smaller to prove out the concept.  So I don’t want people to take away that this model doesn’t work in a market like Augusta.  It does.  You just cannot start to big and your pricing needs to be reflective of the market–it’s got to be lower than what you can otherwise get on Broad street or somewhere else.  The other thing is that the model really should work when you’re trying to also use the space to create new businesses.  So i think it’s one thing that the Clubhou.se has done really well.  And you know–they’re bursting at the seams, and as you know they’re located in the Cyber Center and doing great.  But that’s because the pricing is right.  The location is right, and I think they’ve proven that if you can partner with the right people and get entrepreneurs in that space and activated, that it works.  So that would be my only big takeaway is don’t look at this and say that the concept doesn’t work because it is working.  It just has to be done right.  The Clubhou.se has done a really good job proving that the concept does work. 

JA: Those are great lessons.  

 

A big lesson is the value of good advice–and how important it is as advisors to tell the hard truth to our clients.  What other lessons can you learn from this business case?  What are your thoughts about Coworkign in Augusta?  What is working?  What are lessons you’ve learned in launching a new enterprise? 

Martinez Multifamily Market Report

This is Jonathan Aceves with a 2019 C-Class Multifamily Market Report  and a Martinez Multifamily Rent Study.  Click here to Download our Asking Rent Analysis. We studied 30907 multifamily, particularly around the Steven’s Creek Corridor.   What we found overall is that Class A Space commands about a 50% premium over class B space. 

 

The primary Class A Complex in our study was Nine Two Six West, at 926 Stevens Creek Road.  Nine Two Six averaged $1.26/foot/month asking rent.  Rocky Creek and Iron Horse we considered Class B, which averaged at .84 cents.  Fountainhead we considered Class C, and averaged $.69. 

 

 Takeaways: It does make a difference who the management company  is, where it is advertised, and having good photos and floor plans.  

 

If you are a multifamily investor with north of 20 units, you should sit down with the guys at Doorpost Management.  They can give you the same economy of scale as the as the 200+ unit complexes with their integrated maintenance.  Also the quality of their financial reporting is critical for owners that may be considering sales in the next few years. It’s hard to get a professional investor to take a serious look at your property when your manager can’t provide clean financials and rent rolls.  

 

Overall Multifamily Market Notable Recent Sales:

Crossroads Apartments (B Class-74 Units, sold at 6.91 Cap/$64K per door) 

Baywood Townhomes (C Class-14 Units, Sold at 9.3 Cap/$43K per Door)

2000-2006 Central Avenue (C Class-16 Units, sold at 6.3 CAP/49K per door)

Central Residents Corner (D Class-28 Units–Not yet recorded, sold at 30K per door)

 

We would love to hear your feedback!  What is your opinion of the multifamily market?  As always thanks for watching!  Please Like and share with a friend!

 

 

 

 

Columbia County Apartment Development Rezoning Moves Forward

 

Columbia County Apartments
Blackstone Camp Apartments Elevation
Blackstone Camp Site
Aerial View of Apartment Site

 

Southeastern Development received a recommendation for approval on zoning revision to modify the shape of the site on Blackstone Camp Road.  The property is near the upscale River Island Subdivision in Columbia County.  The project would be limited to 274 units, and would follow the River Island PUD narrative design standards.  Southeastern Development has already started the site work.  The project was technically approved in 2002. It recently has received a lot of criticism from neighbors, including a petition for the Columbia County Commission to reconsider.  

 

I think this is a good project and will ultimately be good for this community.  I think it’s important to have a healthy mix of housing, and new Class-A apartments force older complexes to lower their prices, and create a cycle which helps create a diverse offering of housing products.  Also, A-Class housing becomes B-Class housing, B-Class housing becomes C-Class, and so forth.   

 

It seems that lower-income neighborhoods that don’t want to see change and diversification fight against gentrification, while higher-income neighborhoods that don’t want to see change fight against “higher crime rates” and “overcrowding of schools”.  

 

Hare are a few additional resources, the Augusta Chronicle Article, the recent rezoning application on this project, and a 2010 Study by Columbia County on Multifamily development.  

 

This looks like a great project that should be great for Columbia County.  Augusta is continuing to grow!  What are your thoughts? 

 

 

Multifamily 2-8 Unit Market Update

This is Jonathan Aceves with an update on Multifamily Transactions in the 2-8 Unit Space for 2019.  Here’s the Spreadsheet: 4th Quarter Market Report.   

 

Overall, the market was steady in small multifamily for the year.   The average price per door was $58,256, with an average Gross Rent Multiplier of 7.56.  Anecdotally, we have seen overall interest in Downtown multifamily increase significantly.  

Downtown, we’re seeing rents increasing, and I think this is helping to drive investors to renovate buildings and put make new product available.  The 8-unit complex we sold on Fourth Street I don’t think would have sold two years ago, but rising rents made the property compelling for an investor willing to upgrade the units and reposition the property to students and young professionals.  

 

We reviewed 36 transactions from 2-8 Units, with an average of $58,256 per door, and an average GRM of 7.56.  Average price per foot was 64.07. We did find that GRM went down slightly over the year.  There was one outlier, and when removed the Average GRM was 7.77. 

 

We’ve shown Days on Market by this box and whisker graph, and it shows that 50% of all transactions closed betwen 50-150 days.  There were some transactions that closed over a much longer period, one over 300 days and one at over 700 days.  The overall average was 116 Days.  I think what this shows is that if priced correctly and adequately marketed a multifamily property should close within 4-5 months.  

 

My experience has been that if priced correctly, a multifamily property in this category should go under contract relatively quickly.  We tend to suggest pricing a property with a fair margin to an investor, using market financing assumptions.  Here’s a simple spreadsheet you can use to help think through a multifamily deal: Basic Multifamily Underwriting Worksheet.  

Thanks for reading!  What do you make of the numbers?  What’s your opinion of the market?  

 

 

 

155-Unit Downtown Opportunity Zone Apartment Project Moving Forward–Continued Growth Downtown

 

Artist Rendering of Millhouse Station
Artist Rendering of Millhouse Station

 

Downtown Augusta continues to announce new projects and developments! Developer Ivey Development announced Friday they had closed on the land for a new downtown apartment complex.  This new development is in the immediate vicinity of two other ongoing development projects on Telfair Street, and three blocks from the newly completed Georgia Cyber Center.  

 

Ivey Development, developer for the 155-Unit Apartment Complex at 11th and Fenwick in Downtown Augusta, announced on Friday December 6th that they had closed on he land and were moving forward with the project. McKnight Construction has been selected as the General Contractor.  The land was purchased by Ivey Development from Jeff and Joey Hadden, who also own Phoenix Printing across the street.    

 

1024 Telfair Street – Augusta Office Solutions

This project is 500 feet from Augusta Office Solutions’ new building at 1024 Telfair,and a block from the city’s new fire station at 928 Telfair Street.   RD Brown is the general contractor on 1024 Telfair Project, which appears to be moving along nicely. 

 

This is great news for the City of Augusta!  155 high-end apartments will help fill in the housing gap created by continuing downtown developments, and will continue to press demand for retail and office space in the Central Business District.  

 

Congrats to Beman Group and Ivey Homes on what looks to be an incredible project! McKnight Construction Company, Inc. will serve as the general contractor. Trotter-Jordan represented the seller.  

 

What is your opinion of the downtown momentum?  What do you think we will see in 2020?

 

Augusta Chronicle Article: https://www.augustachronicle.com/business/20191206/ivey-development-acquires-downtown-land-to-build-155-unit-apartment-community

 

MKnight Construction Website: https://www.mcknightconstructionco.com/#1

 

Ivey Development Website: https://www.iveyhomes.com/

 

Article about the new fire station: https://www.augustachronicle.com/news/20190109/new-fire-station-slated-for-telfair-street

 

Update from RD Brown on construction of Augusta Office Supplies’ Telfair Street Building: https://www.browntrusted.com/overview/awards-accolades/

132-Unit Student Multifamily Housing Development given Preliminary Approval

2715 N Davidson
Photo is of the 2715 N Davidson Apartment Development, another project that College Acres was involved with.  –Charlotte Business Journal

 

 

132-Unit Student Multifamily Housing Development on Druid Park Ave given preliminary approval. Myrtle Beach Developer College Acres has proposed to build a four-story #apartment development aimed at Paine & AU students. David Despain, the developer, has developed a number of similar properties, and was also involved in working with Coastal Carolina University for the development of the HTC Center in Conway, SC.

 

It is great to see developers take notice of what’s happening in Augusta. This looks like a great project and should have a big positive impact in that neighborhood!

 

Augusta Chronicle Article: https://www.augustachronicle.com/news/20191202/developer-proposes-student-housing-complex-on-druid-park-ave

 

Info on Charlotte Project: https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/blog/real_estate/2015/07/developers-planning-147-unit-apartment-complex-in.html

 

Info on Wilmington Project: https://www.starnewsonline.com/news/20190103/more-student-housing-proposed-near-uncw

Wilmington Project Approved in October: https://www.wect.com/2018/10/18/wilmington-planning-commission-approves-college-acres-townhome-development/

 

Horry City Council Minutes RE: Tiff Bonds for HTC Center:

https://www.horrycounty.org/Portals/0/Docs/council/archives/min04-0518.pdf

Huge Economic Impact of Topgolf and Dave & Busters for Augusta

 

What are the economic implications of Topgolf and Dave & Buster’s coming to Village at Riverwatch?  According to projections from Augusta Economic Development Authority reported by Damon Cline, these two projects are expected to add $15 million to the local tax base, and add 200 jobs and generate $1M in sales tax revenue.  Hats off to the Economic Development Authority, who was able to help attract these developments without tax incentives, and the only expense is a $250K commitment  to construct the public road that will give these sites access.  

 

What do you think will be the impact of these new developments?  Comment below:

 

Additional Resources:

More Details in Great Article by Damon Cline on this Subject

Village @ Riverwatch website & contact for Jordan Trotter Real Estate who handles leasing

Topgolf Website

Dave & Buster’s Website

 

 

September Industrial Market Report

 

Hi!  Today we’re going to be discussing the Industrial Market Update.  There’s been a few notable sales, the Keebler building sold on 7/28 for 7.4M, $16 per foot, and 1431 Marvin Griffin sold on 6/27 for 2.7M (Jay Willingham handled that one).   On the leasing side a few large leases have been done, the largest is at 4301 Evans To Locks, leased over 400K SF to start in Feb, Acoustic Insulation Techniques leased 75,000 SF in Augusta Forward Drive in June of 2019,and 48KSF leased in April at 1595 Columbia Hwy N in Aiken.  Overall demand for flex is strong, and with the Hock family putting some of their portfolio on the market there is availability of good multi-tenant industrial buildings.  See below for more resources, including details on notable sales and leases, and a link to an overall industrial market report.  

 

Recent Notable Industrial Transactions:

Sales:

  • 2.7M, $32.58/SF, 75,200 SF, sold on 6/27/19 — Electrical Equipment Bldg–1431 Marvin Griffing Rd Marvin Griffin Comp
  • 3M, $47/SF, 64,256 SF, Sold on 5/14/19, Advanced building Advanced Autoparts
  • 7.4M, $16/SF, 453,708SF, Sold on 7/28/19, Keebler Facility – Marvin Griffin rd: 1550 Marvin Griffin Comp
  • 650K, 11,800SF, $55/SF, Sold on 8/1/2019, 3715 Benchmark Warehouse  Benchmark

Leases:

 

Additional Resources: 

Industrial Market Report 9.20.19